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Author Topic: FACTOIDS  (Read 13529 times)

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Jay

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #180 on: January 27, 2004, 08:54:27 PM »

-That quote used to "stare" at me from the door of my piano teacher's studio in college.  And it's still there whenever I go pay a visit.

...Now if I could actually remember the literal translation...<hint>

Well, for one thing, I'm sure your teacher's version didn't mangle the spelling the way I did earlier.  More properly, it is de gustibus non es disputandum es.

Not literally, but figuratively it means "To each his own."  Or, as the French--and Prince Orlofsky--say, "Chacun a son gout."
« Last Edit: January 27, 2004, 09:05:36 PM by Jay »
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JoseSPiano

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #181 on: January 27, 2004, 08:55:10 PM »

DR Jane - There are two agricultural "museums" in DC.  There is the National Arboretum which is on the edge of the DC/MD border, and consists of a bunch of acres of flora, foliage and fauna.  They do offer tours and "exhibits" during the winter months, but it's mainly an outdoor "museum", and it's probably not the most comfortable place to visit this time of year.  For more info, you can click over to:

www.usna.usda.gov/

The other agricultural museum is the United States Botanic Garden which is located on the Mall.  What a beautiful place!  And since it's basically one big greenhouse, it's very warm inside. :)  The Conservatory recently reopened after an extensive restoration and remodeling, and it's quite literally an oasis in the middle of the US Capitol.  And since it's located on the National Mall, you also have easy access to the US Capitol, the various Smithsonian Museums, the Supreme Court, the Folger Shakespeare Library (where you could also catch an evening performance of Craig Wright's new play, Melissa Arctic which is based on Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale - and which I also assisted with during the first few weeks of rehearsals ;)), etc., etc., etc...  Needless to say, I highly recommend the United States Botanic Garden.  For more information click over to:

www.usbg.gov/

And if you happen to need any restaurant recommendations for this visit, Just Ask!  :-)

OH!  And I'll be back up in DC this weekend playing auditions for Syracuse University... If you have no plans for Friday or Saturday evening...

And I hope the weather cooperates with your travels.  I had no idea until a few minutes ago that there was plenty of snow currently falling up in the NY/NJ area - and I'm guessing over in your neck of the woods too.  Safe travels to everyone.
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S. Woody White

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #182 on: January 27, 2004, 08:56:22 PM »

Back to the Oscars.

Add to the list of what nominated films (in any category) that I've seen: Big Fish, which I enjoyed greatly.  Heck, I enjoy about half of what Tim Burton directs, and this was the every-other-film.  (It literally works out as every other film of his that I enjoy, too!)  Too bad it's only nomination is for Danny Elfman's score.

(Previously listed, so you don't have to go back: Finding Nemo, Mighty Wind, LOTR3, and Pirates of the Caribbean.)

Of the other films nominated for anything, add five more that I think I would enjoy seeing: Master and Commander, Seabiscuit, Mystic River, and Brother Bear and Triplets of Belleville, because I love animation.  All of which I can gladly wait until they're on DVD (and yes, I know Seabiscuit is already out, I just wanted a better price on it).

In other words, out of a field of twenty-seven nomininated feature films (not counting the documentary or foreign cagegories), only ten have caught my interest in any way.  That's only a little better than one out of three.

How's everyone else doing on the list, math-wise?
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There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, and the sea's asleep, and the rivers dream; people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice, somewhere else the tea's getting cold. Come on, Ace. We've got work to do.

Jane

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #183 on: January 27, 2004, 08:57:07 PM »

My how I have enjoyed today’s posts.   :)

Good night.
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Jane

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #184 on: January 27, 2004, 08:58:34 PM »

Thank you JoseSPiano.  I will read all the details in the morning.
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SwishySarah

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #185 on: January 27, 2004, 09:00:09 PM »

Jane should go to Occidentals on Pennsylvania Ave. for dinner! It's right next to Chanel, so after you eat you can go and drool at the designer clothing/accesories/furniture :). Not that I would EVER do that...

And I'm not sure if it's allowed anymore, but if there'a any possible way you could get a tour of the Capitol Building, DO IT! I went on one last summer, and it was so much fun! The building is beautiful, absolutely stunning.
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SwishySarah

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #186 on: January 27, 2004, 09:18:12 PM »

...Sarah posts, conversation stops...
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George

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #187 on: January 27, 2004, 09:22:16 PM »

What a wonderful discussion today!  So civilized.  So fair.  So respectful.  And, actually, entertaining too!

And quite informative, also!

I like realism, fantasy, science fiction, animation, etc., etc., etc (a King and I reference)  I don't care so much about the form or setting of the storytelling, just how well the story is told.  And some times that's not even a consideration.  I can thoroughly enjoy a bad movie and absolutely hate a "great" movie.  I don't usually have any problem "suspending disbelief."  If I have a problem with a movie, it usually is with a lapse in the logic that's been created, something just doesn't make sense within the world of whatever I'm watching...and it's also (usually) a minor detail that just bothers me.
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Charles Pogue

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #188 on: January 27, 2004, 09:23:15 PM »

I actually find following the "rules" of a good fantasy film not much different from following the clues and red herrings of a good mystery (Noel, haven't you written a mystery musical?).  My favourite part of the Sherlock Holmes stories are always when the client comes in and tell his/her bizarre story.  There is good confusion and there is bad confusion.  Not having all the answers and understanding all things immediately is not necessarily bad.
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S. Woody White

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #189 on: January 27, 2004, 09:23:20 PM »

And, for something completely different...

Here's a link for this years Broadway Bears, one of the annual charity auctions for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids.  Some of them really work (check out the Lorelei bear!), although a few don't pass muster this time.
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There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, and the sea's asleep, and the rivers dream; people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice, somewhere else the tea's getting cold. Come on, Ace. We've got work to do.

JoseSPiano

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #190 on: January 27, 2004, 09:30:58 PM »

...Sarah posts, conversation stops...

Nah, DR SwishySarah - I'd call it "Prime Time TV on the West Coast".  ;)
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George

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #191 on: January 27, 2004, 09:49:02 PM »

Nah, DR SwishySarah - I'd call it "Prime Time TV on the West Coast".  ;)

Yup.  Right now I'm watching "Keen Eddie" on the Bravo channel.  After that will be the rebroadcast of "Queer Eye" where the guy has been wearing a toupee for 13 years and his wife had never seen him without it and his kids didn't even know that he wore one.  His mother, however, did not want him to take it off.  She thought that it was a bad idea and was upset when he finally revealed his new look...but she did eventually come around.  That was a good "Queer Eye" episode.
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Voldemort is basically a middle school girl: he has a locket, a diary, a tiara, a ring, and is completely obsessed with a teenage boy.

Tomovoz

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #192 on: January 27, 2004, 09:56:29 PM »

Special thoughts and good wishes to Sugar from Fosca.
(she's been there - done that).
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Tomovoz

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #193 on: January 27, 2004, 10:01:43 PM »

A change of topic: The first episode of the new series of "Queer As Folk" was shown here on Monday night. I thought the show could not get worse - it did! Harking back to yesterday's comments about TV series - usually the Brits know how to do it - make only 6 - 10 episodes a year and know when not to make any more. Has the UK series "Teachers" made it to the USA yet. I felt I knew some of the characters quite well - staffroom politics and staff insecurities as they really are.
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"I'm sixty-three and I guess that puts me with the geriatrics, but if there were fifteen months in every year, I'd only be forty-three".
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Matt H.

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #194 on: January 27, 2004, 10:03:49 PM »

In regard to Jane's question about female werewolves.

Go rent the movie WOLF with Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer. That will answer your question.
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Matt H.

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #195 on: January 27, 2004, 10:07:23 PM »

Love, love, love KEEN EDDIE (and the hunkalicious Mark Valley). I recorded it tonight while watching '24' and will see it tomorrow.
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DearReaderLaura

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #196 on: January 27, 2004, 10:08:07 PM »

Just wanted to say hello. I have no opinion about today's topic.

Kerry, I hope you got some oreo cake for MusicGuy today.
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Matt H.

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #197 on: January 27, 2004, 10:09:07 PM »

For those who watched the next episode of AMERICAN IDOL auditions, I felt really bad for the cute guy who sang well enough but gave Simon a bogus, beauty queen answer to what he'd do with the million dollars should he win it. His voice was good enough to move on. Sorry Paula wasn't there to potentially rescue him from their wrath.
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S. Woody White

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #198 on: January 27, 2004, 10:09:54 PM »

...After that will be the rebroadcast of "Queer Eye" where the guy has been wearing a toupee for 13 years and his wife had never seen him without it and his kids didn't even know that he wore one.  His mother, however, did not want him to take it off.  She thought that it was a bad idea and was upset when he finally revealed his new look...
Baldness, of course, is handed down from the mother's side of the family.  Makes you wonder what she looks like without her rug!   ;D
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There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, and the sea's asleep, and the rivers dream; people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice, somewhere else the tea's getting cold. Come on, Ace. We've got work to do.

George

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #199 on: January 27, 2004, 10:15:49 PM »

Love, love, love KEEN EDDIE (and the hunkalicious Mark Valley). I recorded it tonight while watching '24' and will see it tomorrow.

And Ron Moody is in the episode.  I had no idea what he looked like in real life.  I'd only seen pictures of him as Fagin in Oliver from 1960 and the movie.  And he just turned 80 years old on January 8th! (according to IMDb.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2004, 10:19:42 PM by George »
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Voldemort is basically a middle school girl: he has a locket, a diary, a tiara, a ring, and is completely obsessed with a teenage boy.

Jed

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #200 on: January 27, 2004, 10:28:10 PM »

Just want to add to all those saying how enjoyable reading today's conversation has been.  A number of varied opinions, and all stated as such, nothing more.  How horribly civilized! :D
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Ann

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #201 on: January 27, 2004, 10:51:13 PM »

In the spirit of today's lively debate style... :)

I'm not really interested in Star Wars, Star Trek, or E.T. to tell you the truth, but I'm not saying they aren't good films. Maybe it's because of my age, but I have a feeling I would be bored within minutes of these.
I don't think age has much to do with it, honestly.  I saw ET when I was very young, and enjoyed it.  I saw it when I was older, and also enjoyed it.  I know people who were obsessed with it as children, and also those who never cared for it as adults.  Same goes for Star Wars, etc.  I never quite got into the Star Wars thing, but the 5 year old that I babysit LOVES it.  (btw, not my choice to let a 5 year old see such violence...it's the parent's call)   But anyway, I don't think it's age...just personality.


A film is what you make of it, in my opinion. If you walk into a theater with a pessimistic outlook on the movie you're about to see, then the movie isn't going to be great. If you walk in thinking it's going to be a fabulously acted and well made movie, chances are you'll enjoy it, but be a little dissapointed.

It's possible that if you are dogmatically convinced that you are going to hate a movie, you will.  But unless you have REALLY strong opinions, I think anything can happen once the lights go down.  I've walked into movies expecting to hate, and ended up finding real merit in them.  I've also really looked forward to movies, and ended up being very dissapointed.  

Okay, I'll put the soapbox back in the closet for now...:)
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Charles Pogue

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #202 on: January 27, 2004, 10:56:42 PM »

MattH, I agreed with Simon.  I thought the guy was just "okay".  And that charity answer was such bullshit...unlike the girl who said she'd buy an old-model T-bird.  
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Noel

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #203 on: January 27, 2004, 11:17:19 PM »

I actually find following the "rules" of a good fantasy film not much different from following the clues and red herrings of a good mystery (Noel, haven't you written a mystery musical?).  My favourite part of the Sherlock Holmes stories are always when the client comes in and tell his/her bizarre story.  There is good confusion and there is bad confusion.  Not having all the answers and understanding all things immediately is not necessarily bad.

Lovely snow.  Just out my window there's a guy walking down the middle of the street because the sidewalks haven't been plowed yet.

I think explanations in mysteries are completely different than explanations in sci-fi or fantasy.  Mysteries involve the intellect and are fun to follow.

Also, some wonderful fantasy films are wonderful, in part, because they keep the explanation of "rules" down to the minimum.  The Wizard of Oz is a great example.  Dorothy is told she must go to the Emerald City, and a quick string of eighth notes tell her how.  Then there's that annoying heel-clicking explanation at the end, but it's pretty quick.  ET, as far as I recall, did very little explanation.

My mystery musical, Murder at the Savoy, or, Pulley of the Yard contains no clues whatsoever.  It's a parody of mysteries, and so everything in it is funny.  Think Real Inspector Hound if you have trouble picturing this.

But some of my other shows have explanations of "rules" so you can say my distaste for such things were learned the hard way.  The first show of mine to get produced (many years ago, in England) was based on The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.  I wrote it when I was 16 and I didn't know better.  Another show written for a family audience, Popsicle Palace (now called Not a Lion) had an old otter give the history of the land of Figment.  I told the book writer I thought children would not sit still for such a long scene of explanation.  He refused to trim it.

When the show was running in Glendale, selling out every week, I had to return to New York.  But my collaborator continued to attend, to listen to the audience.  Eventually, he told me: "Oh, I should have listened to you about trimming that explanation scene - it's the weakest part of the show."

For my science fiction spoof, Area 51 - The Musical, I got my collaborator to understand: He made the explanation stuff extremely funny.  "The tapioca machine's gone kerflooey.  Run for your lives!"

Does anyone love the Mr. Lundie scene in Brigadoon?

De gustibus was exactly the right thing to say: it's often translated as "There's no accounting for taste."

And now you've got me singing the Howard Dietz translation of Fledermus:

I believe in the French expression, chaçon a son gout
It is more than a mere obsession, chaçon a son gout
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bk

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #204 on: January 27, 2004, 11:44:23 PM »

The word "kerflooey" is not funny, at least in my opinion (IMO, in Internet lingo).  I have never laughed at the word "kerflooey".  Tapioca is mildly amusing, both as pudding and word.  Lithium is a funny word.  
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Charles Pogue

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Re:FACTOIDS
« Reply #205 on: January 27, 2004, 11:45:19 PM »

I don't dislike the Lundy scene and find it essential to the plot.  The audience has been waiting for this answer to explain the mysteries of Brigadoon that they have encountered those far.  Without that explanation, THE CHASE sure would lose it's drama and impact.  So would the ending of the show.    It's all tied to the Lundy scene.  Without it, nothing after it makes much sense.

I also think the audience often like a respite from the action where things get quiet and they can reflect and recap and think on the stuff they need to know for the rest of the show.

I'm a great believer in the mystical unity of three...which means repeating things three times...The old vaudeville adage of "tell 'em what you're goin' do, do it, tell 'em what you just did."  

So I occasionally try  to remind the audience of certain things they need to remember and keep it all fresh in their mind...I try to do it differently and entertainingly each time and not beat the horse, but remind them so the pay-offs pay-off.

That 's the thing about the "mystical unity of three"... it's straight dramatic technique: the set-up, the build, the pay-off".
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