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Author Topic: THE MORSE CODE NOTES  (Read 22718 times)

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Jay

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #30 on: March 21, 2004, 10:31:01 AM »

I am leaving now to head to the County of Orange for lunch with me Mum and "An Evening with Dame Edna," even though the performance takes place during the afternoon.
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Panni

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #31 on: March 21, 2004, 10:55:20 AM »

I am leaving now to head to the County of Orange for lunch with me Mum and "An Evening with Dame Edna," even though the performance takes place during the afternoon.
What fun! Full report on the hilarity and high jinks, please.
(And tell us about Dame Edna, too.)
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bk

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #32 on: March 21, 2004, 11:00:09 AM »

Love Dame Edna.  We had quite a high old time together in the recording studio.   Everyone must be off brunching or reading.
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George

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #33 on: March 21, 2004, 11:17:02 AM »

And yes, BK, there are other Code writers:

Deep into the 'Code'

'Da Vinci' talks, tours, follow-up books serve a renaissance of interest in art and religion.
By Renee Tawa
Times Staff Writer

March 19, 2004

On a rainy day in Paris last week, 50-year-old Linda Ackerman headed to the Louvre for a bit of detective work.... <SNIP>

der Brucer (furiously posting to get the site count up)

der Brucer, thanks for the link.  I work for a library and every two months I run a report that lists all of the high demand titles, then I order the needed extra copies.  "The Da Vinci Code" is always high up on the list.  Our fiction selector is reluctant to buy as many copies as the number of holds demands, mainly because she read the book and didn't really like it.  As they say...there's no accounting for taste. ;)

As for today's agenda, I'm just about to take a shower, then I will head over to my sister's old house (my soon-to-be new house) so that we can clean up and paint and get it ready for me to move in!  I'll be gone all day and sadly, won't be able to chat tonight.  Have a good one!
« Last Edit: March 21, 2004, 11:18:24 AM by George »
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Charles Pogue

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #34 on: March 21, 2004, 11:33:09 AM »

William Lurie, speaking of the GAY DIVORCE, I received one of the best compliments of my acting career from Claire Luce who starred in the original production with Fred Astaire and danced to Night & Day with him.  Also the first American actor to play Stratford, she was guest director one summer at the Globe of the Great Southwest where I started my illustrious career.  She directed Twelfth Night.  And over the summer we became fairly bonded, because it was my job to pick her up every day and drive her to the theatre.  Later, after the summer, we worked in an original play at the Globe about critic George Jean Nathan, who she personally knew and was still friends with Julie Hayden, his wife.  But that summer, after the opening of MacBeth, in which I was playing Malcolm, she swept backstage, kissed me, and announced in front of all:  "It's so good to hear A VOICE in the theatre again!"  I'll always prize the memory.
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Ron Pulliam

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #35 on: March 21, 2004, 11:45:26 AM »

Ah, yes, DR MattH...thanks for straightening out my alliteracy!

:D
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Jenny

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2004, 11:45:55 AM »

Everyone MUST be reading Kritzer Time.  

No, but I have been reading "Benjamin Kritzer", which arrived this morning (On a sunday!  I was shocked!)!  I always wondered what this "What is it, fish?" business was all about, and I feel far more in the loop knowing what you crazy people have been talking about.  Thank you for sending it, BK! :-*

Can I also say, last night my dear partner and I, both adjudicators for Rochester's "Stars of Tomorrow" program (like the Tony's, but for high school shows) went to see a production of IRENE in, of all places, Romulus, NY.  And it was WONDERFUL.  The girl playing Miss Irene O'Dare gave one of the most polished performances I have seen on a stage, professional or otherwise, in many a new day.

I wish that something like that existed on Long Island!  We have a girl at our school (Currently playing the title character in "Hello, Dolly!") who could easily win a contest like that.  She's one of the most talented singers I've ever heard, regardless of age.
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Charles Pogue

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2004, 11:49:48 AM »

Frank Langella, who is an actor I much admire and have been fortunate enough to see on three occasions onstage, has often written eloquently on the profession and experience of being an actor.  He has written a tribute to the late Alan Bates in the current issue of Equity News, a lovely moving memory piece about working with him on Broadway in Fortune's Fool (for which Bates won a Tony) and of their professional and personal relationship that grew out of it up until Bates' death.  It's one of those bits of writing that make me happy to be in the profession, proud to have trod the boards, and that reinforces my image of these two men, both as actors and human beings.
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S. Woody White

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2004, 12:08:33 PM »

As for today's agenda, I'm just about to take a shower, then I will head over to my sister's old house (my soon-to-be new house) so that we can clean up and paint and get it ready for me to move in!...
Don'cha love hand-me-downs?!
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Panni

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #39 on: March 21, 2004, 12:12:24 PM »

Big news -- Just finished cleaning out my closet. Hallelujah!
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Jenny

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #40 on: March 21, 2004, 12:21:49 PM »

::Pokes cheeks:: My face hurts.  Stupid allergies.
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DearReaderLaura

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #41 on: March 21, 2004, 12:27:01 PM »

Swedish Chef Hat had a fun spring break. Here it is, visiting the Yuma Territorial Prison Museum in Yuma, Arizona.
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DearReaderLaura

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #42 on: March 21, 2004, 12:28:35 PM »

And here is Swedish Chef Hat meeting "Mr. Swallow" at San Juan Capistrano.
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Matt H.

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2004, 12:48:12 PM »

Is the licensed version of IRENE currently used the version Debbie Reynolds did on Broadway, or is there some other version floating around out there that the licensers issue? Curious about this.
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Matt H.

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2004, 12:52:55 PM »

I had planned to spend this afternoon watching the Special Extended Edition of LORD OF THE RINGS: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RINGS, but a friend called to invite me to a 4 p.m. dinner and I didn't want to see the film in pieces, so I postponed it and put in THE CIRCUS from the CHAPLIN COLLECTION VOL 2 boxed set (just as hilarious as ever) followed by THE BODY IN THE LIBRARY, the Miss Marple mystery with the wonderful Joan Hickson. Off to the dinner now.
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elmore3003

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #45 on: March 21, 2004, 01:02:36 PM »

Is the licensed version of IRENE currently used the version Debbie Reynolds did on Broadway, or is there some other version floating around out there that the licensers issue? Curious about this.

It's my suspicion that Tams-Witmark rents both the original show and the 70s revival; they rent all three versions of ANYTHING GOES.

DR Panni, I love the photo!  

Was it Mr Lurie who saw GAY DIVORCE?  I worked on it for the Cole Porter Trust several years ago to prepare it for a BBC Radio 3 broadcast.  I think the show's quite funny and I love the score, especially "How's Your Romance?" and "I've Got You On My Mind."  Some of it, like the Helen Broderick numbers and Eric Blore's number about the Prince of Wales, are clearly incidental, but I think it deserves a complete recording with its fantastic orchestrations.
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elmore3003

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2004, 01:04:42 PM »

Frank Langella, who is an actor I much admire and have been fortunate enough to see on three occasions onstage, has often written eloquently on the profession and experience of being an actor.  He has written a tribute to the late Alan Bates in the current issue of Equity News, a lovely moving memory piece about working with him on Broadway in Fortune's Fool (for which Bates won a Tony) and of their professional and personal relationship that grew out of it up until Bates' death.  It's one of those bits of writing that make me happy to be in the profession, proud to have trod the boards, and that reinforces my image of these two men, both as actors and human beings.

When I was preparing BABES IN TOYLAND for the Houston Grand Opera, Frank was doing MY FAIR LADY for them, and he was a wonderful Henry Higgins.  Conductor John de Main took us all to lunch one day and I decided that Mr Langella was one of the best persons offstage as well.
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Panni

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2004, 01:20:57 PM »

Glad you like the photo, Larry!

I'm sure that Frank Langella is a very nice man, but his wonderfully creepy Quilty in the 1998 version of LOLITA with Jeremy Irons has forever marked him in my brain with an "S" (for sleazy) on his forehead.
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Noel

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #48 on: March 21, 2004, 01:22:00 PM »

I think Sondheim is jealous of Hart (whom I consider to be the greatest lyricist ever).  Hart lived in a time when cleverness was the most-prized virtue of a lyric.  Hammerstein's strong suit, on the other hand, was the emotional romantic song, such as The Folks Who Live On the Hill or If I Loved You.  I've actually not heard Sondheim say much in praise of Hammerstein, the lyricist, although he obviously appreciated Hammerstein the person.  Mentor.  Teacher.

Here's my controversial thought of the day: Sondheim's strong suit is the clever, not the romantic.  I'm not saying he's never done the romantic well, but my favorite Sondheim songs are the most Hart-like - You Can Drive a Person Crazy, You're Gonna Love Tomorrow/Love Will See Us Through - that sort of thing.  Sometimes, when he attempts to write a love song, he seems to trip over his tongue.  What's a word like "implacable" doing in an expression of ardor?  "Crazy business this, this life we live in" just makes me choke.  Nobody talks that way; it's not romantic to do so.

But I certainly "felt the love" in Sunday in the Park With George, which is about an artist who is unable to express his feelings, except through his work.  So, nothing that George says moves me - he's intentionally inarticulate, emotionally distant - but when his daughter points out that, in the painting, "Mama is everywhere.  He must have loved her so much," I cry buckets.

In a way, much of Sondheim's career has been a rejection of what Hammerstein taught by example.  We see couples falling in love and getting together in South Pacific and Oklahoma.  We see couples rushing to divorce in Merrily We Roll Along and Follies.  It seems Sondheim is more interested in depicting unsuccessful liaisons, unlike Hammerstein.

And sometimes, as an audience member, I'm left unmoved by Sondheim shows.  I think that there's some truth to his reputation for being cold: Pacific Overtures and Assassins were interesting history lessons, but not emotional experiences for me.  Passion seemed ironically titled.  Even in the most gorgeous of his shows, A Little Night Music, the characters seem to be more motivated by sex than love.

I admire Sondheim most as a songwriter, not as a show writer.  That is, there are a great number of his songs that I think are wonderful (and, yes, emotional and romantic).  But there are just a few of his shows that satisfied me, as a whole, in the theatre.
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elmore3003

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2004, 01:55:47 PM »


Hart lived in a time when cleverness was the most-prized virtue of a lyric.  Hammerstein's strong suit, on the other hand, was the emotional romantic song, such as The Folks Who Live On the Hill or If I Loved You.


Well, DR Noel, let me throw in some ideas here, too!  I love Hart's lyrics, but to me he is the antithesis of what we're led to believe is good theatre writing:  he's the poet laureate of the broken heart, and I believe his lyrics are more personal than theatrical.  

What I love about period musical comedy, from Victor Herbert to Cole Porter, is that no matter where its plot is set, the show never leaves New York; what is the "Roxy Music Hall" doing in Budapest? Are those Syracuse boys really in ancient Greece, and, if so, what are Romeo and Juliet doing in ancient Greece  as well?  Not to mention the night boat up the Hudson to Albany?

I think Hart's lyrics are a history of the path to self-destruction by a lovelorn masochist setting his broken heart to sublimely romantic and cynical verse.  By the time of the 1940s CONNECTICUT YANKEE, you've got lines like "if you count your friends on the fingers of your hand, you're lucky to have two."  That's a long haul from the optimistic "I've Got Five Dollars" of the 1920s and 30s, and somewhere in the middle lies the great "Falling in Love with Love"; the singer's disillusioned but Rodgers' great waltz says it ain't over yet.  Don't you think the poignancy of "My Romance" isn't that is says what is says so brilliantly but that you know Hart believed it, probably many times over, but knew he was Nobody's Hart?

I remember seeing in the Library of Congress Hammerstein's notes on CAROUSEL; there was a handwritten recipe for clam chowder and info on clambakes, notes on dialects, the fishing industry, everything to acquaint himself with the milieu of 19th Century New England.  I admire his ambitions and his results, but I could never see Lorenz Hart giving a single thought to such research.  This is how I see Steve Sondheim working as well;  during the creation of INTO THE WOODS I gave Patricia Sinnot, Steve's office manager at the time, and James Lapine suggestions for various books on fairy tales and folklore beyond Bruno Bettelheim, especially THE GREAT CAT MASSACRE, a history of 18th Century France I really admire.  I believe there was some real psychoanalysis of Cinderella's character to get to "On the Steps of the Palace," something I can never see happening in a Hart lyric.

One last comment about Sondheim and Hart; I think his closest attempt to do a Hart lyric is his version of "He and She" in DO I HEAR A WALTZ: "We're Gonna Be All Right."

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bk

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2004, 02:07:05 PM »

It depends on what you mean by "heart" (not Hart).  "Heart" isn't just romantic songs.  There is heart aplenty in Send in the Clowns or Sorry-Grateful or Every Day a Little Death and The Road You Didn't Take - rueful, but heart.  And let's not forget his lyric to Small World, which is a wonderful romantic lyric.  Little Lamb has heart and emotion - simple and true.  What Can You Lose? is extremely heartfelt.  Anyone Can Whistle has heart.  And I like his lyric to With So Little To Be Sure Of.  
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Danise

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2004, 03:16:19 PM »

Good early evening all!

What a nice day!  It was nice and warm and quite lovely.  I forgot to tell you that I got 2 bags of dirt yesterday when I was out and about.  I spent all afternoon outside weeding and digging and planting.  I donít mind getting dirt under my nails.  

I can't wait to see my little four Oíclocks raise their little heads to the sun for the first time.  I also planted some sunflowers and Brodiaea.

What is it about putting a little seed into the good earth that makes you feel so good?  Iím tired tonight but itís a good tired.

The GREAT LIZARD made itís yearly appearance.  I have to explain that.  Every year when Iím planting the lizards come out.  The males all try to impress me with their displays of red from under their throats but I have them beat.  I pinch my cheek until itís a nice bright red then puff it out at them.  Their little eyes just about pop out of their head!  

I think this is a great help to them as word spreads among the lady lizards in the neighborhood.  I think they all flock to see the GREAT LIZARD and that gives the local guy a chance to step up to the plate and say, ďNo, Iím SpartacusĒ, as it were.  

In any case, we should be seeing lots of baby lizards in the coming weeks.  I donít know how baby lizards come about in other places but here the GREAT LIZARD is glad to play a part.

I just love the little ďbaby dragonsĒ as I call them.  With their bright eyes and little toe nails, they are so cute.  I love catching and petting them for a moment or two before I put them back to go their merry way.

In the good news/bad news category.  When I opened the supply shed, there was my frog prince.  Unfortunately, he was not alone.  It seems he has decided not to wait for me to kiss him and has himself a lady.  I can see he is a leg man because she had the prettiest pair of frog legs Iíve ever seen.  

Iím quite crushed, as you might imagine, but what could I do?  I simply closed the door and left them alone.   Sigh.   I guess I could say Iím green with envy but that would make me sound like a bitter old spinster.   ;)

Gee, that Swedish Chef Hat sure does get around.  

 Iíll be at chat for a short time tonight.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2004, 03:35:36 PM by Danise »
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bk

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2004, 03:18:29 PM »

I'll say nothing.
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Tomovoz

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #53 on: March 21, 2004, 03:33:43 PM »

Sometimes a wise decision BK.
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Tomovoz

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #54 on: March 21, 2004, 03:47:43 PM »

Seems so strange for Danise (and others) to be talking about the "Rites Of Spring" when we are in wrongs of Autumn over here. ("Fall" is not a term we use for the season here).
No wrongs of Autumn really - I think it is my favourite season. I have already gathered this year's hazelnut crop. The chestnuts have a few weeks to go as yet. "The Christmas Song" is so inappropriate here as we would certianly not be roasting chestnuts in December - more probably May.
At least I'm posting!
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Stuart

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #55 on: March 21, 2004, 03:49:05 PM »

Is the licensed version of IRENE currently used the version Debbie Reynolds did on Broadway,

Yes, it was the Reynolds version, and did include "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows."  I had heard at sme point that this song was optional, much like "Take Me to the Fair" from CAMELOT.  I am not saying I agree with that idea, or that it makes any sense, but it was something I had heard along the way.....

The ANNIE this afternoon was.....not good.
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Robin

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #56 on: March 21, 2004, 03:50:49 PM »

It's movie day today.  

Actually, it's rare that we don't see at least two movies in the cinema on the weekends.  We love everything about going to the movies; checking the schedules, waiting in line, going to the concession stands, watching the trailers...if there's a heaven, it's a gigantic cinema, with every movie ever made playing in a theater with stadium seating.  

The Significant Other and our buddy Randy (and opposed to a randy buddy) went off to the googleplex and caught showings of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and the remake of Dawn of the Dead.  

They liked the first better; I, however, liked the former.  I just cannot warm myself to Jim Carrey, in whatever mode he's in.  
« Last Edit: March 21, 2004, 03:54:04 PM by Robin »
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Jennifer

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #57 on: March 21, 2004, 03:52:14 PM »

Okay I feel very bad that there are not more posts today.  So I shall contribute now.

It snowed here today.  And yesterday.  It melts right away.  But I'm done with snow.  I want spring.

Oh and speaking of weather, the weather channel said there will be a windchill tonight/tomorrow morning of -25C.  What the heck is that about???
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Jennifer

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #58 on: March 21, 2004, 03:55:54 PM »

Today I watched Mona Lisa Smile, which while somewhat uplifting, was not totally satisfying. I do like Julia Roberts.  But I don't think I was in the mood for this type of movie today.

Then I went shopping.  Bought a nice new black jacket. Then attempted to pick up a few items at the grocery store.  But it was afternoon, and they ran out of all the sale items I wanted :(

I hate that. Rainchecks, rainchecks and more rainchecks.

On a brighter note, new Alias and The Practice tonight.
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Robin

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Re:THE MORSE CODE NOTES
« Reply #59 on: March 21, 2004, 03:57:36 PM »

I think I may be the only person alive who didn't finish reading The DaVinci Code.  I thought it poorly written and boring.  

Benjamin Kritzer and Kritzerland...not boring.  Just wonderful.  
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