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Author Topic: THE EYES HAVE IT  (Read 51127 times)

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Jason

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #240 on: September 22, 2005, 10:08:38 PM »

DR Jose: No...another Michael. This one went out on tour with my roommate, Jenn. He's a really sweet guy...quite adorable.

We missed you tonight, but hopefully you'll be able to make it sometime. If not next week, then some week. :)

And now I'm off to bed!
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JoseSPiano

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #241 on: September 22, 2005, 10:11:42 PM »

Well, since I am still a bit drowsy as I mentioned earlier, I think I am going to head to bed in a few.  Which is a good thing, since I want to get up early (earlier) tomorrow to take care of a few things - including calling my bank (ugh!) and getting that whole mess straightened out.  So...

Goodnight.

*And if I am going to be called a WUSSBURGER WITH CHEESE, I'd prefer to be paired with either Feta (with Pepper Bacon), or Bleu Cheese (with Caramelized Onions).
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Cillaliz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #242 on: September 22, 2005, 10:25:31 PM »

Paper Clips is a documentary about a school in Tennessee where the 8th graders were studying the Holocaust and couldn't get their minds around the number of people killed. So they decided to collect  paper clips. Their goal was to honor every lost soul with a paper clip. They wrote to all kinds of people and it caught on. Many Holocaust survivors sent clips etc. Anyway, they ended up collecting 11 million paper clips representing the 6 million Jews and 5 million others killed and thanks to some help from those who were fascinated by the story, were able to get an actual train car used in WWII to transport people to the concentration camps.  

It is now a Holocaust Children's Memorial, and contains all kinds of other information that was sent to the school from all over the world.  The movie is going to be playing here Sunday night. I'm planning to go.

I just wondered if anyone had seen it. Here's the website if anyone is interested www.paperclipsmovie.com
« Last Edit: September 22, 2005, 10:27:11 PM by Cillaliz »
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Cillaliz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #243 on: September 22, 2005, 10:33:17 PM »

On a lighter note, The Aristocrats is going to be playing here in October. I'm in shock. I never thought I'd get to see that in Sioux City, IA!  
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Jrand70

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #244 on: September 22, 2005, 10:37:08 PM »

Yes, DRMATTH - the correct title is THE MARRIAGE OF BETTE AND BOO.  And it is as DtM described it.

The narrator is the child of the couple and the other characters include his parents, of course, his grandparents and a couple of others.

I played his maternal grandfather in a production.  His name is Paul...and because he has suffered a stroke he speaks only in gibberish.  It was a challenge to say the least.  Some of it is funny, but it is very bitter and probably more fun to be in than to watch.

There are other Durang plays I have worked on that I enjoyed much more.
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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #245 on: September 22, 2005, 10:43:04 PM »

 Thousands of dogs run loose in New Orleans
By Michael Brick The New York Times

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 200
 
 
NEW ORLEANS Up North Claiborne Avenue five dogs ran as a pack between smashed houses under dead power lines, through the twisted junkscape of lumber and tin, a wall marked "Possible Body" and a headless Virgin Mary with arms outstretched.
 
The dogs, including a German shepherd, a beagle and a yellow Labrador, roam the city, gaunt and uncomprehending, at turns frightened and menacing, loping directionless between ruined buildings, drinking the muck, staring at cars, waiting to die.
 
They are everywhere. A week ago, their self-appointed rescuers spoke of reuniting them with masters, but that talk has ended. Now the dogs are an infestation, untold thousands unwell, unrestrained and left to their devices.
 
"I'm afraid that they'll be out here for years," said Wendy Guidry, among those who spend their days trying to corral the dogs. "That there'll be a long-term population of dogs that will never be caught, that will live on the streets for years and eventually be hit by cars. That will be their lives."
 
The dogs do not lack for sympathy or attendants. From the first days after Hurricane Katrina laid waste to this city, images of pets that were left behind over the protests of their owners drew crowds of rescue volunteers. Money was gathered and airlifts were chartered.
 
Among the crowded flights bound for New Orleans when Louis Armstrong Airport reopened last week, on planes full of cowboy contractors and corporate fixers, the earnest came to save the dogs.
 
On a connection out of Atlanta, Crystal Smith made the first flight of her life to join the Humane Society in New Orleans. She was afraid of the dogs she would find.
 
"They're becoming vicious," she said. "But it's not because they're hungry and they want to eat people. They're scared. They're stressed out; they've been living on the roof. And they don't know what you're here for."
 
More than 400 rescuers are based at the Lamar-Dixon Expo Center in Gonzales, Louisiana, 60 miles, or 95 kilometers, away, said Julie Morris, director of national outreach for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. With credentials from New Orleans, they enter the city to chase animals, and they have captured about 7,000.
 
How many remain no one knows. Based on human demographics, the American Veterinary Medical Association has estimated that 50,000 to 70,000 dogs were kept as pets in New Orleans.
 
"There's nobody who knows how many people successfully evacuated with their animals," Morris said.
 
That leaves pets abandoned in the evacuation of the city, the feral population and the pit bulls trained to fight for sport, a significant pastime here before the storm. Rescuers on the streets said the bigger dogs were dying first.
 
"We were seeing dogs eating dead dogs," Guidry said.
 
Those removed from the city are increasingly diseased. Sixty have been euthanized in Gonzales.
 
"The longer it goes on, the worse that's going to get," Morris said.
 
On the streets, though, the dogs are learning to survive. Rescuers, soldiers and journalists leave the dogs food, and sometimes the food is gone when the people return. Rescuers have found dogs cowering in houses, but many dogs, called runners, remain on the streets.
 
 
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Cillaliz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #246 on: September 22, 2005, 10:55:06 PM »

It wasn't just the dogs left behind.....

New Orleans: Prisoners Abandoned to Floodwaters
22 Sep 2005 18:15:21 GMT

Source: Human Rights Watch

(New York, September 22, 2005)-As Hurricane Katrina began pounding New Orleans, the sheriff's department abandoned hundreds of inmates imprisoned in the city's jail, Human Rights Watch said today. Inmates in Templeman III, one of several buildings in the Orleans Parish Prison compound, reported
that as of Monday, August 29, there were no correctional officers in the building, which held more than 600 inmates. These inmates, including some who were locked in ground-floor cells, were not evacuated until Thursday, September 1, four days after flood waters in the jail had reached chest-level.

"Of all the nightmares during Hurricane Katrina, this must be one of the worst," said Corinne Carey, researcher from Human Rights Watch. "Prisoners were abandoned in their cells without food or water for days as floodwaters rose toward the ceiling."

Human Rights Watch called on the U.S. Department of Justice to conduct an investigation into the conduct of the Orleans Sheriff's Department, which runs the jail, and to establish the fate of the prisoners who had been locked in the jail. The Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, which oversaw the evacuation, and the Orleans Sheriff's Department should account for the 517 inmates who are missing from list of people evacuated from the jail.

Carey spent five days in Louisiana, conducting dozens of interviews with inmates evacuated from Orleans Parish Prison, correctional officers, state officials, lawyers and their investigators who had interviewed more than 1,000 inmates evacuated from the prison.

The sheriff of Orleans Parish, Marlin N. Gusman, did not call for help in evacuating the prison until midnight on Monday, August 29, a state Department of Corrections and Public Safety spokeswoman told Human Rights Watch. Other parish prisons, she said, had called for help on the previous Saturday and Sunday. The  evacuation of Orleans Parish Prison was not completed until Friday, September 2.

According to officers who worked at two of the jail buildings, Templeman 1 and 2, they began to evacuate prisoners from those buildings on Tuesday, August 30, when the floodwaters reached chest level inside. These prisoners were taken by boat to the Broad Street overpass bridge, and ultimately transported to correctional facilities outside New Orleans.

But at Templeman III, which housed about 600 inmates, there was no prison staff to help the prisoners. Inmates interviewed by Human Rights Watch varied about when they last remember seeing guards at the facility, but they all insisted that there were no correctional officers in the facility on Monday, August 29. A spokeswoman for the Orleans parish sheriff's department
told Human Rights Watch she did not know whether the officers at Templeman III had left the building before the evacuation.

According to inmates interviewed by Human Rights Watch, they had no food or water from the inmate's last meal over the weekend of August 27-28 until they were evacuated on Thursday, September 1. By Monday, August 29, the generators had died, leaving them without lights and sealed in without air
circulation. The toilets backed up, creating an unbearable stench.

"They left us to die there," Dan Bright, an Orleans Parish Prison inmate told Human Rights Watch at Rapides Parish Prison, where he was sent after the evacuation.

As the water began rising on the first floor, prisoners became anxious and then desperate. Some of the inmates were able to force open their cell doors, helped by inmates held in the common area. All of them, however, remained trapped in the locked facility.

"The water started rising, it was getting to here," said Earrand Kelly, an inmate from Templeman III, as he pointed at his neck. "We was calling down to the guys in the cells under us, talking to them every couple of minutes. They were crying, they were scared. The one that I was cool with, he was saying 'I'm scared. I feel like I'm about to drown.' He was crying."

Some inmates from Templeman III have said they saw bodies floating in the floodwaters as they were evacuated from the prison. A number of inmates told Human Rights Watch that they were not able to get everyone out from their cells.

Inmates broke jail windows to let air in. They also set fire to blankets and shirts and hung them out of the windows to let people know they were still in the facility. Apparently at least a dozen inmates jumped out of the windows. "We started to see people in T3 hangin' shirts on fire out the windows,"

Brooke Moss, an Orleans Parish Prison officer told Human Rights Watch. "They were wavin' em. Then we saw them jumping out of the windows . . . Later on, we saw a sign, I think somebody wrote 'help' on it." As of yesterday, signs reading "Help Us," and "One Man Down," could still be seen hanging from a
window in the third floor of Templeman III.

Several corrections officers told Human Rights Watch there was no
evacuation plan for the prison, even though the facility had been evacuated during floods in the 1990s.

"It was complete chaos," said a corrections officer with more than 30 years of service at Orleans Parish Prison. When asked what he thought happened to the inmates in Templeman III, he shook his head and said: "Ain't no tellin' what happened to those people."

"At best, the inmates were left to fend for themselves," said Carey. "At worst, some may have died."

Human Rights Watch was not able to speak directly with Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin N. Gussman or the ranking official in charge of Templeman III. A spokeswoman for the sheriff's department told Human Rights Watch that search-and-rescue teams had gone to the prison and she insisted that "nobody drowned, nobody was left behind."

Human Rights Watch compared an official list of all inmates held at Orleans Parish Prison immediately prior to the hurricane with the most recent list of the evacuated inmates compiled by the state Department of Corrections and Public Safety (which was entitled, "All Offenders Evacuated"). However, the
list did not include 517 inmates from the jail, including 130 from
Templeman III.

Many of the men held at jail had been arrested for offenses like criminal trespass, public drunkenness or disorderly conduct. Many had not even been brought before a judge and charged, much less been convicted.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2005, 10:55:32 PM by Cillaliz »
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Cillaliz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #247 on: September 22, 2005, 10:58:24 PM »

I'm getting too serious here, time to get some sleep
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bk

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #248 on: September 22, 2005, 11:18:06 PM »

I can no longer remember the word of the day.  I hate when that happens.

New notes are written.
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Tomovoz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #249 on: September 22, 2005, 11:42:10 PM »

I think the word of the day had something to do with the bubonic plague.
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bk

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #250 on: September 22, 2005, 11:57:57 PM »

PHLEBITIS, baby, PHLEBITIS!  That's what I'M talkin' about.  Why is Sandra just sitting there like so much fish?
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Tomovoz

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #251 on: September 23, 2005, 12:01:00 AM »

I'm still hoping that the fleas won't bite us. Each to his own.
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"I'm sixty-three and I guess that puts me with the geriatrics, but if there were fifteen months in every year, I'd only be forty-three".
James Thurber 1957

Sandra

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Re:THE EYES HAVE IT
« Reply #252 on: September 23, 2005, 12:02:10 AM »

Sandra is sitting here like so much fish because she is tired and doesn't feel like getting up.
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