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Author Topic: THE GRAND POOBAH  (Read 27993 times)

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bk

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THE GRAND POOBAH
« on: March 28, 2006, 12:07:18 AM »

Well, you've read the notes, you know what Poobah spelled backwards is, and now it is time for you to post until the cows come home - they are, of course, the Grand Moobah.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2006, 12:07:57 AM by bk »
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bk

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2006, 12:07:57 AM »

And the word of the day is: HIRSUTE!
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DakotaCelt

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2006, 12:09:46 AM »

Just wanted to say hello before I became a Wussburger and settled in front of the telly...

Have a pleasant evening and I may stop by in the morning...
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Tomovoz

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2006, 12:27:09 AM »

To paraphrase missing DR Jay  - Some of us were born without the opera gene.

I tried attending a  couple of seasons and saw a few of the usual suspects byt Puccini and Verdi.  I just did not get involved - glorious melodies though.

The lines bewteen the forms of musical theatre are always blurred for me.

I've enjoyed some G & S but have never really liked "The Mikado".  "Patience" is very funny and I enjoy Pirates and Pinafore.

I like "The Merry Widow" and "Orpheus In the Underworld". I also enjoy the music of the "Student Prince", "Bitter Sweet" and the Novello Operettas.
For me "Kismet" belongs there too; a  favourite of mine.
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Michael

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2006, 04:44:20 AM »

I guess people of our generation don't know from operettas except for G & S shows. So I have to say that of their shows that I have seen I enjoyed The Mikado (Doyle Carte Production), HMS Pinafore (Local Production) and The Pirates of Penzance (NY Shakespeare Company) and I would like to forget I ever saw the Pirate Movie.
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Michael

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2006, 04:49:00 AM »

For S. Woody White:

What songs were cut from this production of Shenadoah? (I guess the Finale of Pass the Cross to Me was one of them)
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Dan (the Man)

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2006, 05:36:57 AM »

TOD:

Hmmm...not much of an opera buff here.  I do like going to see them occaisionally and always watch any PBS broadcasts.  The only favorites I can list:

La Boheme
Aida
Wager's Ring Cycle
Don Giovanni

and, of course, Tutti's Cosy Fanny
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Dan (the Man)

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2006, 05:39:45 AM »

DR JRand, you were correct last night in naming Momma Mia Farrow as the face that appeared on the cover of the first issue of People (which featured an extended article on the release of THE GREAT GATSBY.)
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elmore3003

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2006, 05:47:00 AM »

Good morning, all!  I was working on this number yesterday for Miss Karen Ziemba, and suddenly there she was on a LAW & ORDER CRIMINAL INTENT rerun as the ex-alcoholic girlfriend of the serial killer doctor.  And she had the brooch!  It was all too too.  So, today I will finish the band parts for this number and proceed to the next.  

TOD:  I feel too informed on this one, so I'll just mention my currrent naughty operetta obsession: "White Horse Inn" or "Im Weissen Rossl" or "L'auberge du Cheval Blanc," set in the Tyrol at the turn-of-the-century (20th).  Great tunes and a lot of yodeling.

Opera:  I've been playing Weber's OBERON a lot these days, but I can always listen to TOSCA, CARMEN, or MARRIAGE OF FIGARO and lose myself.
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Jrand68

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2006, 06:15:15 AM »

DR JRand, you were correct last night in naming Momma Mia Farrow as the face that appeared on the cover of the first issue of People (which featured an extended article on the release of THE GREAT GATSBY.)

:)
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Jrand68

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2006, 06:17:11 AM »

Well HMS PINAFORE is my favorite operetta with the DR ELMORE-recommended CD of the Doyly Carte Opera Company being my favorite.  It's a pip!

I think THE MERRY WIDOW is an operetta....or is it an opera?  Anyway, I like it a lot, too.  But I do not have a recording of it, only excerpts on various CD's.  Ditto with AIDA.
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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2006, 06:28:30 AM »

I am thinking about buying this "soundtrack" of MADAME BUTTERFLY - my most favorite PooBah of all operas....but I am not sure exactly what it is.

Has any DR seen this movie or DVD?

http://cgi.ebay.com/MADAME-BUTTERFLY-Soundtrack-Highlights-CD-MINT_W0QQitemZ4812880662QQcategoryZ307QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
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elmore3003

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2006, 06:28:40 AM »

Well HMS PINAFORE is my favorite operetta with the DR ELMORE-recommended CD of the Doyly Carte Opera Company being my favorite.  It's a pip!

I think THE MERRY WIDOW is an operetta....or is it an opera?  Anyway, I like it a lot, too.  But I do not have a recording of it, only excerpts on various CD's.  Ditto with AIDA.

DRJRand55, there's a wonderful complete DIE LUSTIGE WITWE on Deutsche Gramophon conducted by John Eliott Gardiner for a complete German widow, although the nearly complete recordings with Elizabeth Schwartzkopf have a better leading lady.  All the English versions are excerpts only.

There's also a nice DVD of the Widow from San Francisco with Yvonne Kenny.
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S. Woody White

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2006, 06:29:08 AM »

For S. Woody White:

What songs were cut from this production of Shenadoah? (I guess the Finale of Pass the Cross to Me was one of them)
That was the only song cut.  Der Brucer was familiar with the show, from the original staging, and remarked about how close this staging was to the Broadway production, right down to where some of the props and furniture were positioned.  (It's nice to have someone with that good a memory critiquing the show during the drive home.)
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S. Woody White

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2006, 06:33:14 AM »

My favorite opera moment is when Elmer, in his Magic Helmet, sings "Kill the Wabbit!"

(A Chuck Jones reference, 'natch.)
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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2006, 06:42:01 AM »

Does STREET SCENE count as an opera?  Both times I've seen it have been in opera houses, and I've loved it, as overwrought and opera-ish as it sometimes becomes.

Quite to my surprise, MOSES UND ARON (SP?) at New York City Opera was one of the more moving experiences I've had at a live performance.  Also the HARVEY MILK opera, which was odd but extremely involving.

I saw the Broadway LA BOHEME four times, loving the production but having story problems with the last act.  (What's the big deal that they give up their winter-wear in the heat of summer to possibly save a friend's life? :) )  Since it was apparently a rethinking geared towards theater audiences,  I'm not sure I can count the piece itself as a favorite, but that was one heck of  a production.

I have yet to see a production of PORGY AND BESS that I love, but I love listening to it, though.

Does Barbara Cook at the Met count as opera?  :)

Otherwise, I don't have the opera-loving gene, either.  The closer it is to musical theater, the more I seem to enjoy it.
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elmore3003

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2006, 06:42:21 AM »

I am thinking about buying this "soundtrack" of MADAME BUTTERFLY - my most favorite PooBah of all operas....but I am not sure exactly what it is.

Has any DR seen this movie or DVD?

http://cgi.ebay.com/MADAME-BUTTERFLY-Soundtrack-Highlights-CD-MINT_W0QQitemZ4812880662QQcategoryZ307QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

The film is wonderful.  I'd get the DVD over a compact disc; I don't know how great the voices are without the visuals, but the casting for the film is quite photogenic, the score is handled well, and the film is quite moving.
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elmore3003

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2006, 06:43:55 AM »

My favorite opera moment is when Elmer, in his Magic Helmet, sings "Kill the Wabbit!"

(A Chuck Jones reference, 'natch.)

One of mine, too!  I also love Anna Russell, prima donna of the Ellis Island Opera Company, and her operatic parodies, such as "Anemia's Death Scene."
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vixmom

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2006, 06:53:08 AM »

ONE DAY, WHEN A SEAMSTRESS WAS SEWING WHILE SITTING CLOSE TO A RIVER, HER THIMBLE FELL INTO THE RIVER. WHEN SHE CRIED OUT, THE LORD APPEARED AND ASKED, "MY DEAR CHILD, WHY ARE YOU CRYING?"

THE SEAMSTRESS REPLIED THAT HER THIMBLE HAD FALLEN INTO THE WATER AND THAT SHE NEEDED IT TO HELP HER HUSBAND IN MAKING A LIVING FOR THEIR FAMILY.

THE LORD DIPPED HIS HAND INTO THE WATER AND PULLED UP A GOLDEN THIMBLE SET WITH PEARLS. "IS THIS YOUR THIMBLE?" THE LORD ASKED.

THE SEAMSTRESS REPLIED, "NO."

THE LORD AGAIN DIPPED INTO THE RIVER. HE HELD OUT A SILVER THIMBLE RINGED WITH SAPPHIRES. "IS THIS YOUR THIMBLE?" THE LORD ASKED.
 
AGAIN, THE SEAMSTRESS REPLIED, "NO."

THE LORD REACHED DOWN AGAIN AND CAME UP WITH A LEATHER THIMBLE. "IS THIS YOUR THIMBLE?" THE LORD ASKED.

THE SEAMSTRESS REPLIED, "YES."

THE LORD WAS PLEASED WITH THE WOMAN'S HONESTY AND GAVE HER ALL THREE THIMBLES TO KEEP, AND THE SEAMSTRESS WENT HOME HAPPY.

SOME YEARS LATER, THE SEAMSTRESS WAS WALKING WITH HER HUSBAND ALONG THE RIVERBANK, AND HER HUSBAND FELL INTO THE RIVER AND DISAPPEARED UNDER THE WATER. WHEN SHE CRIED OUT, THE LORD AGAIN APPEARED AND ASKED HER, "WHY ARE YOU CRYING?"

OH LORD, MY HUSBAND HAS FALLEN INTO THE RIVER!"

THE LORD WENT DOWN INTO THE WATER AND CAME UP WITH MEL GIBSON. "IS THIS YOUR HUSBAND?" THE LORD ASKED.

YES!," CRIED THE SEAMSTRESS

THE LORD WAS FURIOUS. "YOU LIED! THAT IS AN UNTRUTH!"
 
THE SEAMSTRESS REPLIED, "OH, FORGIVE ME, MY LORD. IT'S A MISUNDERSTANDING. YOU SEE, IF I HAD SAID 'NO' TO MEL GIBSON, YOU WOULD HAVE COME UP WITH TOM CRUISE. THEN IF I SAID 'NO' TO HIM, YOU WOULD HAVE COME UP WITH MY HUSBAND. HAD I THEN SAID 'YES,' YOU WOULD HAVE GIVEN ME ALL THREE. LORD, I'M NOT IN THE BEST OF HEALTH AND WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF ALL THREE HUSBANDS, SO THAT'S WHY I SAID 'YES' TO MEL GIBSON."

THE MORAL OF THIS STORY IS: WHENEVER A WOMAN LIES, IT'S FOR A GOOD AND HONORABLE REASON, AND IN THE BEST INTEREST OF OTHERS.

THAT'S OUR STORY, AND WE'RE STICKING TO IT!!
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FJL

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2006, 06:53:34 AM »

The Hamlet opera parody on GILLIGAN'S ISLAND to the tune of the March of the Toreadors is a favorite as well.  I believe it ended with:

And there's one other thing you ought to do
To thine own self be true.

GILLIGAN'S ISLAND was smart people writing a very silly show.
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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2006, 06:54:58 AM »

I wanted to make a comment on filmed opera, since a lot of the  DRs are screen buffs:

I just mentioned my comments on MADAMA BUTTERFLY.

CARMEN with  Domingo, Migenes, Esham:  it's a great Spanish film, although Domingo is a tad too mature for the part of a young man led astray; the score is missing one number in Act Three, but the rest is all there, well-performed, sexy, intense.

LA TRAVIATA, directed by Zefferelli, with Stratas and Domingo:  perhaps too lush visually, with lots of musical cuts, but stunning.  Stratas is not in the greatest voice, but her vulnerability and focus are wonderful.

TALES OF HOFFMAN, recently released on Criterion, wioth Robert Roundesville, Robert Helpmann, Pamela Brown, etc.:  it may not be exactly what Offenbach intended but it's one of my favorite films, and interestingly staged.

There's a wonderful taped performance of HOFFMANN from Covent Garden with Domingo, well directed by John Schlesinger.

THE MAGIC FLUTE:  Mozart and Ingmar Bergman make beautiful magic.

DR FJL, I would consider STREET SCENE an opera, as opposed to MOST HAPPY FELLA, which Loesser considered a musical with a lot of music.

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vixmom

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2006, 06:58:50 AM »

TOD:  G & S Mikado   I saw a BBC production  I loved but I don't theparticulars off hand, I borrowed it from my library

and Pirates of Penzance the Joseph Papp version whic I had the good fortune to see on Broadway with the original cast


Opera's I know nothing  about


I never saw a stage version of Jesus Christ Superstar but  I absolutely loved the concept album when it came out, was that considered a Rock Opera or a  Operetta? I wore out my copy from repeated replayings...  I haven't heard it in years so I don;t know if I would still feel the same way about it.

I also loved the Broadway production I saw of Les Miserables that must have been around 1989 or 1990


That is all
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vixmom

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2006, 07:02:38 AM »

Oh elmore, I rented the BBC Colin Firth version of  P & P from Blockbuster yesterday and started to watch it and wouldn't you know that the dang thing froze right during Winfield's talk with Jane at the party?!!

AUUUGH... cleaning etc did no good and that is their only copy ... I may have to go out and buy it now.

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S. Woody White

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2006, 07:09:09 AM »

Dear Vixmom: The lady in question would have to choose between Mel Gibson, Tom Cruise, and her husband?

 :P

And I always thought the Lord had good taste.
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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2006, 07:16:47 AM »

I forgot to mention Jean-Pierre Ponnelle's film of MARRIAGE OF FIGARO!  A lot of the arias are treated as inner monologues over sequences, and the casting is excellent with beautiful 18th Century settings and costumes.
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vixmom

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2006, 07:24:13 AM »

Dear Vixmom: The lady in question would have to choose between Mel Gibson, Tom Cruise, and her husband?

 :P

And I always thought the Lord had good taste.

Oh there's nothing wrong with Tom Cruise and Mel Gibson...






















 as long as they don't speak!!!   ;D
« Last Edit: March 28, 2006, 07:28:21 AM by Vixmom »
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elmore3003

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #26 on: March 28, 2006, 07:29:24 AM »

Oh there's nothing wrong with Tom Cruise and Mel Gibson...

 as long as they don't speak!!!   ;D

We already know they don't think!
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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #27 on: March 28, 2006, 07:37:45 AM »

Damn Amazon.  Anyway, it (Heidi Grant Murphy: Times Like This) is available there.  
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Jrand68

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2006, 07:44:21 AM »

She didn't want to wear her slacks to the interview so she wore hirsuite.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2006, 07:44:43 AM by JRand55 »
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bk

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Re:THE GRAND POOBAH
« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2006, 07:47:12 AM »

I'm up, I'm up.

I basically only know the operas of Puccini from the classice repertoire.  However, I do have a fondness for several American operas and since no one has mentioned any, I shall:  Robert Ward's wonderful opera of The Crucible, Aaron Copland's The Tender Land, Samuel Barber's Antony and Cleopatra (not as a whole, though) and Vanessa, and Jack Beeson's one-act opera of Hello Out There.
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